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US HistoryAnswers 1Bids 70Other questions 10Tips 0

US HistoryAnswers 1Bids 70Other questions 10Tips 0

COMPETENCIES1002.1.1English Colonization and the Road to RevolutionThe graduate analyzes the colonial experience and the foundations of the American Revolution.1002.1.2The Early Republic and the American Civil WarThe graduate analyzes the challenges of partisan politics and sectionalism in the Early Republic and Civil War eras.1002.1.3Reconstruction and the Age of American ImperialismThe graduate examines the major changes that defined the United States in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.1002.1.4The Making of Modern AmericaThe graduate explains significant international and domestic challenges that the United States confronted since World War I.INTRODUCTIONHistorians work with two types of sources: primary and secondary. Primary sources are letters, diaries, films, photographs, newspaper articles, and any other artifacts that were produced by people living through the events of a historical period. Historians study and draw on these sources in order to recreate the past for the current generation. These recreations are called secondary sources. Secondary sources are books, articles, and websites that historians and other authors write about the past—A People and a Nation is an example of a secondary source.The analysis of primary sources is an important part of understanding both the culture of the past and the meaning of current events. Primary sources reveal the different perspectives that groups of people and individuals had on contemporary debates as well as the variety of responses historical actors can have to the same event. By investigating how people responded to their situations in diverse historical contexts, we can learn how individuals felt about events as they unfolded and can appreciate their divergent perspectives. This appreciation builds empathy that assists us as we approach individuals with different perspectives in our workplace and daily lives.In this assessment, you will work with one of the following four time periods in United States history:• English Colonization and the Road to Revolution• The Early Republic and the American Civil War• Reconstruction and the Age of American Imperialism• The Making of Modern America For each of these periods, you will have a pair of two primary sources. For your chosen historical period, you should use your knowledge and analytical skills—in addition to relevant readings from the A People and A Nation  text—to provide context for these primary sources and to explain how they relate to one another. In this assessment, you will select one historical period and then analyze the corresponding two primary sources.REQUIREMENTSYour submission must be your original work. No more than a combined total of 30% of the submission and no more than a 10% match to any one individual source can be directly quoted or closely paraphrased from sources, even if cited correctly. An originality report is provided when you submit your task that can be used as a guide.You must use the rubric to direct the creation of your submission because it provides detailed criteria that will be used to evaluate your work. Each requirement below may be evaluated by more than one rubric aspect. The rubric aspect titles may contain hyperlinks to relevant portions of the course.A.  Write an essay (suggested length of 2–3 pages) on one of the historical periods from the list provided in the introduction, using the corresponding primary sources. In your essay, do the following:Note: You can refer back to the text, A People and A Nation, for additional information about these time periods.1.  Analyze the point of view of primary source A by doing the following:a.  Describe the major characteristics of primary source A (e.g., the author’s background, the main ideas presented, the reasons it was created).b.  Explain how primary source A reflects the major events of the chosen historical period (e.g., social movements, developing ideologies, international conflicts).2.  Analyze the point of view of primary source B by doing the following:a.  Describe the major characteristics of primary source B (e.g., the author’s background, the main ideas presented, the reasons it was created).b.  Explain how primary source B reflects the major events of the chosen historical period (e.g., social movements, developing ideologies, international conflicts).3.  Discuss how the two primary sources relate to each other within their historical context.Note: This may include major themes of the period or social/political movements that define the era.B.  Provide acknowledgement of source information, using in-text citations and references, for quoted, paraphrased, or summarized content.1.  Include the following information when providing source references:•   author•   date•   title•   location of information (e.g., publisher, journal, or website URL)RUBRICARTICULATION OF RESPONSE (CLARITY, ORGANIZATION, MECHANICS):NOT EVIDENTThe candidate provides unsatisfactory articulation of response.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate provides weak articulation of response.COMPETENTThe candidate provides adequate articulation of response.A1A:CHARACTERISTICS OF SOURCE ANOT EVIDENTThe candidate does not provide an appropriate description of the major characteristics of primary source A.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate provides an appropriate description, with insufficient support, of the major characteristics of primary source A.COMPETENTThe candidate provides an appropriate description, with sufficient support, of the major characteristics of primary source A.A1B:REFLECTIONS OF SOURCE ANOT EVIDENTThe candidate does not provide a logical explanation of how primary source A reflects the major events of the chosen historical period.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate provides a logical explanation, with insufficient support, of how primary source A reflects the major events of the chosen historical period.COMPETENTThe candidate provides a logical explanation, with sufficient support, of how primary source A reflects the major events of the chosen historical period.A2A:CHARACTERISTICS OF SOURCE BNOT EVIDENTThe candidate does not provide an appropriate description of the major characteristics of primary source B.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate provides an appropriate description, with insufficient support, of the major characteristics of primary source B.COMPETENTThe candidate provides an appropriate description, with sufficient support, of the major characteristics of primary source B.A2B:REFLECTIONS OF SOURCE BNOT EVIDENTThe candidate does not provide a logical explanation of how primary source B reflects the major events of the chosen historical period.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate provides a logical explanation, with insufficient support, of how primary source B reflects the major events of the chosen historical period.COMPETENTThe candidate provides a logical explanation, with sufficient support, of how primary source B reflects the major events of the chosen historical period.A3:RELATING EACH SOURCENOT EVIDENTThe candidate does not provide a logical discussion of how the 2 primary sources relate to the other within their historical context.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate provides a logical discussion, with insufficient detail, of how the 2 primary sources relate to the other within their historical context.COMPETENTThe candidate provides a logical discussion, with sufficient detail, of how the 2 primary sources relate to each other within their historical context.B:SOURCE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTNOT EVIDENTThere is evidence of quoted, paraphrased, or summarized content without acknowledgement of source information in in-text citations and references.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate provides insufficient acknowledgement of source information, using in-text citations and references, for quoted, paraphrased, and summarized content.COMPETENTThe candidate provides sufficient acknowledgement of source information, using in-text citations and references, for all quoted, paraphrased, and summarized content.B1:SOURCE INFORMATIONNOT EVIDENTThe candidate does not include the given points when providing source references.APPROACHING COMPETENCEThe candidate includes the given points, with incomplete or inaccurate information, when providing source references.COMPETENTThe candidate includes the given points, with accurate and complete information, when providing source references.REFERENCE LISTNorton, M. B., Kamensky, J., Sheriff, C., Blight, D. W., Chudacoff, H. P., Logevall, F., . . . Michals, D. (2014). A People and A Nation: A History of the United States, Brief Edition (10th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.WEB LINKSEnglish Colonization and the Road to RevolutionPrimary Source A: Backus, I. (1999). An appeal to the public for religious liberty. In Patrick, John J. and Long, Gerald P. (Eds.), Constitutional debates on freedom of religion (pp. 24–27). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=5007075&ppg=46 (Original work published 1773)English Colonization and the Road to RevolutionPrimary Source B: A peace sect wrestles with the problem of hiring a substitute. (2002). In P. Brock (Ed.), Liberty and conscience: A documentary history of the experiences of conscientious objectors in America through the Civil War (pp. 55–56). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=10085232&ppg=68 (Original work published 1781)The Early Republic and the American Civil WarPrimary Source A: Turner, N. (2006). Nat Turner describes his rebellion. In C. Waldrep & M. A. Bellesiles (Eds.), Documenting American violence: A sourcebook (pp. 124–127). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=10142487&ppg=139 (Original work published 1831)The Early Republic and the American Civil WarPrimary Source B: Douglass, F. (2009). Fourth of July oration. In J. Bean & G. Saari (Eds.), Race and liberty in America: The essential reader (pp. 38–42). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=10495368&ppg=61 (Original work published 1852)Reconstruction & Age of American ImperialismPrimary Source A: Riis, J. (2009). Jacob Riis chronicles the struggles of the urban poor. In L. C. Hillstrom (Ed.), Defining moments: Muckrakers and the Progressive Era (pp. 165–169). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=10355663&ppg=183 (Original work published 1890)Reconstruction & Age of American ImperialismPrimary Source B: Roosevelt, T. (2009). President Theodore Roosevelt promises progressive reform. In L. C. Hillstrom (Ed.), Defining moments: Muckrakers and the Progressive Era (pp. 159–164). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=10355663&ppg=177 (Original work published 1901)The Making of Modern AmericaPrimary Source A: Friedan, B. (1963). The problem that has no name. In D. Keetley & J. Pettegrew (Eds.), Public women, public words: A documentary history of American feminism (pp. 24–35). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=10714455&ppg=24 (Original work published 1963)The Making of Modern AmericaPrimary Source B: Jones, B., Blair, A., Ehrenreich, J., Hochschild, A. R., & McKenna, E. P. (2005). Giving women the business: on winning, losing, and leaving the corporate game. In D. Keetley & J. Pettegrew (Eds.), Public women, public words: A documentary history of American feminism (pp. 660–678). Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/lib/westerngovernors/reader.action?docID=10714455&ppg=661 (Original work published 1997)Rubric Terms

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